Medical Articles

Specialty Spotlight: Infected Corneal Ulcers

Specialty Spotlight: Infected Corneal Ulcers Keith Montgomery, DVM, DACVO As the summer weather heats up, our canine and feline patients are more active outdoors, and we see an increase in the number of traumatic corneal ulcers as well as other traumatic eye injuries.  Bacterial corneal infections also become more prevalent with increasing temperatures and humidity.  Common bacteria that infect the cornea include Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Pseudomonas spp.  Clinical signs of a bacterial corneal infection include cellular infiltrate, delayed corneal healing,…

Specialty Spotlight: Meningoencephalitis of Unknown Origin

Specialty Spotlight: Meningoencephalitis of Unknown Origin Laura Krzykowski, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology) There are a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases that can lead to encephalopathy in our canine patients. In this region of the country, we see autoimmune disease far more commonly than infectious diseases.  The subtypes of autoimmune encephalitis are named according to the type and distribution of inflammation seen on histopathology (Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis, Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis, Necrotizing Leukoencephalitis). Clinically, MRI and spinal tap results can overlap between these categories,…

Specialty Spotlight: Classifications of Shock

Specialty Spotlight: Classifications of Shock Madeline Libin, DVM, DACVECC There are several types of shock, but ultimately the definition of shock is consistent. Shock is the result of any condition in which the metabolic demand for oxygen exceeds uptake and utilization of oxygen. Most cases of shock are due to decreased delivery of blood to tissues. Shock is typically divided into categories that help explain why oxygen delivery is not matching demand. The box below outlines five broad categories of shock (Silverstein and Hopper 2015)….

Specialty Spotlight: Flash Glucose Monitors – the Cure for the Difficult Diabetic?

Flash Glucose Monitors – the Cure for the Difficult Diabetic? Sara Arnold, DVM, DACVIM (Internal Medicine) Difficult diabetics are exhausting. When we see a new consult for a diabetic on our internal medicine service, that appointment almost surely promises to be the longest one of the day. Between the extensive histories, comorbidities, dietary changes, review of insulin administration, storage, etc., the time invested in these patients is extensive. Frustratingly, determining the status of diabetic regulation can also be difficult. Fructosamines…

Specialty Spotlight: Minimally Invasive Surgery for Management of Lung Tumors

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Management of Lung Tumors Joseph Palamara, DVM, DACVS-SA Minimally invasive surgery is a constantly evolving field of veterinary surgery. Competency and expertise in minimally invasive surgery are requirements in the process of board certification in small animal surgery. Thoracoscopy, laparoscopy and arthroscopy are minimally invasive procedures which involve surgery of the chest, abdomen and joints, respectively. Advances in technology adapted from human surgery and innovations developed by veterinary surgeons have enabled a wide array of surgical…

Specialty Spotlight: Pulmonary Hypertension

Pulmonary Hypertension Cassidy Sedacca, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Cardiology) Pulmonary hypertension is a life-threatening condition widely present in veterinary medicine, yet largely underdiagnosed. Chronic upper or lower airway diseases are commonly diagnosed syndromes in dogs and cats, but few realize that long-term alveolar hypoxia created by such conditions often results in a silent transformation of pulmonary vasculature resulting in pulmonary hypertension.  Left untreated, pulmonary hypertension can result in irreversible pulmonary and cardiac changes, clinical deterioration, right-sided heart failure, and death. Luckily,…

Specialty Spotlight: Is Conservative Management of Cruciate Disease a Viable Option for Your Patient…or Owner?

Is Conservative Management of Cruciate Disease a Viable Option for Your Patient…or Owner? Laura Perez, DVM, CVA, CCRT At the risk of opening an enormous can of worms, I’ve decided to give my 2 cents on conservative management of cruciate disease.  Ask many vets and most surgeons and they are going to tell you that surgery is the only viable option.  Ask another group of vets or those that strictly do complementary therapy and they are likely going to tell…

Specialty Spotlight – The Importance of Immunohistochemistry in Oncology

The Importance of Immunohistochemistry in Oncology Ariana Verrilli, DVM, (practice limited to Oncology) It is not uncommon for a cytology or biopsy report to land on our desk where the interpretation reads “malignant neoplasia” or “round cell neoplasia” or some equally broad interpretation or diagnosis.  What does this mean?  What do we tell our clients about their pet’s diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis?  When a biopsy says “malignant neoplasia” we can tell the client the tumor is not benign, but…

Ocular Trauma

Ocular Trauma – How do I Know if the Eye Can be Saved? Christa Corbett, MS, DVM, DACVO With the active summer season approaching, trauma cases will be on the rise.  Ocular trauma can be very intimidating but it’s important to establish whether the eye and/or vision can be saved or whether enucleation is the most humane option.  This article will focus on the more common types of ocular trauma, and try to provide a framework to understand how best…

Upstate Veterinary Specialties take on Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Upstate Veterinary Specialties take on Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy Dear Colleagues, Recent evidence has led the US FDA to announce that diets including legumes, lentils, peas and potatoes as main ingredients may be linked to the development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs. Typically, most of these diets are marketed as “grain-free”. This has led to a lot of concern, confusion and frequent questions from our clients, the general public and our referring veterinary community. We thought we would reach out…